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Having drama in your life a choice?

The conservation of drama

Everyone has a set point, a need/tolerance for a certain amount of drama in a life. I’m not talking about important work, I’m highlighting the excitment and tension that surrounds the things that happen to us (or might happen).

The newspaper is always just about the same length, regardless of what’s happening in the world.

Politicians seem to have the capacity to deal with a given amount of tough stuff. When the urgent wanes, they make up something new. When there’s too much, they decrease their perception of its urgency.

Last example: a restaurant kitchen has a very narrow range indeed. The amount of terror or urgency in a particular kitchen doesn’t actually vary that much between a reasonably slow night and one where there are two or three VIPs out front or if its a banquet for a thousand people. We adapt and adjust and most of all, we shift our perception of precisely how important that particular emergency actually is.

It’s easy to persuade yourself that this time it’s different, that this time the drama is real, and that, in fact, it’s all (truly) going to fall apart. In fact, though, it’s all imagined. Drama isn’t the work, it’s our take on the work. Drama doesn’t have to exist, certainly not in the way we’re living it, not right now. A few days or weeks or years from now, this work will be so commonplace to you, you won’t blink.

If drama was an actual external force, how could emergency room doctors, dictators and short order cooks ever survive? They’re dealing with so much incoming, they’d melt.

If the drama is helping you and your organization do your work and enjoy it, then by all means, have fun. But understand that drama is a choice.

Posted by Seth Godin on September 17, 2013

Go to the Gym?


Either, not both

Stand out or fit in.

Not all the time, and never at the same time, but it’s always a choice.

Those that choose to fit in should expect to avoid criticism (and be ignored). Those that stand out should expect neither. (Seth Godin)

I get phone calls from people wanting to know my “gym membership” price and I tell them GT Fitness is not a GYM, this is a process that you don’t buy when you “go to the gym”.

This is a different world we live in today compared to the generations past and by striving to be fit and healthy you are being different from the norm

Thank you for being different with me!!

“Being a novice is way overrated”

The myth of preparation – Seth Godin (repost)

Beginner.001-001

There are three stages of preparation. (For a speech, a product, an interview, a sporting event…)

The first I’ll call the beginner stage. This is where you make huge progress as a result of incremental effort.

The second is the novice stage. This is the stage in which incremental effort leads to not so much visible increase in quality.

And the third is the expert stage. Here’s where races are won, conversations are started and sales are made. A huge amount of effort, off limits to most people, earns you just a tiny bit of quality. But it’s enough to get through the Dip and be seen as the obvious winner.

Here’s the myth: The novice stage is useful.

If all you’re going to do is go through the novice stage before you ship, don’t bother. If you’re not prepared to put in the grinding work of the expert stage, just do the beginner stuff and stop screwing around. Make it good enough and ship it and move on.

We diddle around in the novice stage because we’re afraid. We polish (but not too much) and go to meetings (plenty of them) and look for deniability, spending hours and hours instead of shipping. And the product, in the end, is not so much better.

I’m all for expertise. Experts, people who push through and make something stunning–we need more of them. But let’s be honest, if you’re not in the habit of being an expert, it’s unlikely your current mode of operation is going to change that any time soon.

Go, give a speech. Go, start a blog. Go, ship that thing that you’ve been hiding. Begin, begin, begin and then improve. Being a novice is way overrated.

What He said is Better

Image representing Seth Godin as depicted in C...

Image via CrunchBase

“This better work”

… is probably the opposite of, “this might work.”

“This better work,” is the thinking of safety, of proven, of beyond blame.

“This might work,” on the other hand, is the thinking of art, innovation and insight.

If you spend all day working on stuff that better work, you back yourself into a corner, because you’ll never have the space or resources to throw some ‘might’ stuff into the mix. On the other hand, if you spend all your time on stuff that might work, you’ll never need to dream up something that better work, because your art will have paid off long ago.

This is a repost from Seth Godin and holds true for those people out there trying to find a way to fight Obesity.  I see people everyday who have no confidence in themselves and are always looking for a person, place or thing to answer the question as to why they can’t lose body fat.  There is no quick fix, its lifestyle change that makes it happen.

:You have to expect things of yourself before you can do them.” – Michael Jordan

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