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Obesity is Bad

Ovarian Cancer Awareness: Knowing is Preventing

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September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month which happens to be the biggest killer among cancers for women.

Although I don’t have cancer (yet) both my parents smoked and both grandfathers died of cancer, I recently was lucky enough to participate in an Ovarian Cancer Seminar this past week at the  Christ Episcopal Church where I got to listen to some excellent presentations by surgeons who are fighting the battle on the front lines.  They brought some great insight and information on the war they fight each day to help people survive.

They talked big on genetic marker tests, which will help identify “who” is at increased risk for developing ovarian cancer which they can use to keep regular check-ups to catch the disease early as possible.  While I really appreciate this kind of data and presence available to the patient, another part of me sees it different.

My feeling is that knowing you are at an increased risk, buying and paying for insurance premiums (healthcare is a business) you still can not and will not at this point, prevent cancer from developing in your body.  What you can do though is be prepared, mentally, physically, socially, and emotionally for the opportunity to fight your own battle, God forbid it ever comes.

Only the strong survive, and keeping your body prepared to fight infection and disease is the only thing you can do to decrease your risk of developing cancer and hopefully increase your chance of living through such dreaded and painful times.

The best thing you can do, is increase your knowledge and awareness with a plan that can help you live!!

Release yourself from the negatives, the stress, worry, and mental strain you can put on.  We can not stop cancer from forming in our bodies, but we can enjoy each other and the days we have left together.

That’s just my opinion (thank you Miliska)

Here is a link to the story from the seminar last weekend.

“Genetic markers seen as key in ovarian cancer”

Exercise May Improve Odds Against Prostate Cancer Death #gettoned2011

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Exercise May Improve Odds Against Prostate Cancer Death

HealthDay
By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter
– Wed Jan 5, 11:47 pm ET

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) — Prostate cancer patients who routinely engage in modest amounts of vigorous physical exercise appear to lower their risk of dying from their disease, new research suggests.

Three hours a week or more of vigorous biking, tennis, jogging or swimming seems to improve the prognosis among such patients, the research team found. But they added that even moderate physical activity appears to lower the overall risk of dying from any cause.

“This is the first study in men with prostate cancer to evaluate physical activity after diagnosis in relation to prostate cancer-specific mortality and overall mortality,” noted study author Stacey Kenfield, a research associate in the department of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, as well as at the Channing Laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, both in Boston.

“We observed benefits at very attainable levels of activity,” Kenfield added, “and our results suggest that men with prostate cancer should do some physical activity for their overall health, even if it is a small amount, such as 15 minutes of activity per day of walking, jogging or biking. Vigorous activity may be especially beneficial for prostate cancer, as well as overall health, at levels of three or more hours per week.”

The findings are published in the Jan. 4 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The researchers noted that although prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, the news is not all grim. They pointed out that more than 80 percent of prostate cancer patients have localized disease, and the 10-year survival rate post-diagnosis is upwards of 93 percent. The upshot is that more than 2 million American men are prostate cancer survivors.

To explore how exercise might further improve the odds of survival, Kenfield and her colleagues tracked the physical exercise routines of just over 2,700 men who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer after 1990. The assessments took place every two years.

Activities that were assessed included walking, jogging, running, bicycling, swimming, rowing, stair-climbing, and playing tennis, squash, racquetball and/or golf. Weight-lifting and arduous outdoor work were also included in the analysis, and all activities were given a so-called “metabolic equivalent task” ranking, or MET value, according to the amount of energy each required relative to being sedentary.

After giving non-vigorous activities a MET ranking of less than 6 and vigorous activities a value of 6 and up, the authors determined how many MET hours per week were expended by each patient based on the nature and pace of each activity they engaged in.

Ultimately, 548 of the patients died during the study period, one-fifth as a direct result of their prostate cancerdiagnosis. But the research team found that the more active patients had been, the lower their risk of dying from prostate cancer itself or any other cause.

The more hours the patients devoted to either vigorous or non-vigorous exercise routines, the better they fared in terms of survival. For example, men who tallied as much as nine or more MET hours per week — equivalent to jogging, biking, swimming or playing tennis for 90 minutes per week — had a 33 percent lower risk for dying from any cause and a 35 percent lower risk for dying from prostate cancer than men who expended less than nine MET hours per week.

Vigorous activity, however, seemed to confer a stronger survival benefit than non-vigorous activity. Compared with men who participated in vigorous exercise (such as biking, tennis, jogging, running, and/or swimming) for less than one hour per week, those who engaged in three hours or more had a nearly 50 percent drop in deathrisk due to any cause and a 61 percent drop in the risk of dying specifically from prostate cancer. In fact, only vigorous activity was linked to a drop in prostate cancer death risk, the study authors noted.

That said, however, even minimal activity routines gave patients an advantage in terms of overall survival. For example, men who registered between five and just under 10 hours per week of non-vigorous activity had a 28 percent lower risk for all-cause mortality compared with men who engaged in less than one hour per week of similar exercise. And that relative risk plummeted 51 percent among men who logged more than 10 hours per week of similar types of exercise.

Focusing specifically on walking (the most popular activity, accounting for more than one-third of total MET-hours per week among the patients), Kenfield and her team found that seven or more hours per week of walking conferred a “significant benefit” relative to walking less than 20 minutes per week.

The authors further found that pace mattered, as those men who walked at a “normal” pace had a 37 percent lower risk of dying from any cause than men who walked at an “easy” pace. Those who walked at a “brisk” or “very brisk” pace fared even better, experiencing a 48 percent drop in their risk for death.

“There are a number of pathways through which exercise could have an effect on prostate cancer biology,” noted Kenfield. “Physical activity increases insulin sensitivity and may affect insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) bioactivity, which influences cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis — the formation of new blood vessels — and can lead to cancer progression. Physical activity also lowers inflammatory factors and boosts immune function. How these molecular actions work together to affect prostate cancer biology and outcomes are currently being studied.”

Dr. Basir U. Tareen, the physician-in-charge of urologic oncology at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City, described the study as “groundbreaking.”

“We’ve known for a long time that people who exercise in general are healthier and have better cardiovascular health,” he noted. “So it’s not surprising to me that people who exercise have improved overall survival. But we haven’t specifically looked at exercise in terms of prostate cancer survival before. And it’s very encouraging to see a very well-done study where they found they could systematically show that with increasing exercise that you can see a pretty significantly improved cancer-specific survival,” Tareen continued.

“So, this study will hopefully be a gateway to many more studies, because we have yet to figure out exactly on the molecular level exactly why this happens. It probably has something to do with people who exercise having a decreased likelihood of inflammation or it could be related to the immune system. But already now I can tell my patients that if they exercise at least three hours or more per week they have a major risk reduction in cancer mortality,” Tareen said.

Complex is really Simple

Just watched this awesome 3:43 video about Complexity and got me thinking real “simply”

http://ted.com/talks/view/id/1006

Very simply the reason I get out of bed is to meet someone who’s health and well-being could benefit from my education and expertise in the human body and fitness.  That’s why I took out a business loan, that’s why I bought my own exercise equipment and that is the only reason I am spending my time writing this blog (THANKS for reading)

The  whole “obesity” problem boils down to one thing, If WE can get YOU to get up, get fit and get toned, then all of US win.  I promise that if you make a difference in your life, someone will notice and be motivated and so excited for you that because of you they will want to make change too!  We all want to be part of a  successful and prosperous group.

So back to my original thought – it simply starts with one person or family member to motivate another and we will all benefit from this connected effort to better health and well-being.

All of Us can, if You will

Harmful or Fatal if Swallowed – Hidden Chemicals

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease

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Think of this  

Since 1950 we have added chemicals to our bodies that were never heard of before we manufactured them and put into products we use: insecticides, cosmetic and personal-care products, cleaning solutions, paint, fuel, food, and industrial pollutants from factories.

[In the Lab]

Synthetic chemicals don’t belong inside the human body and it is only common sense to take into consideration that they’re not good for you.  Some of the chemicals pass inspection because levels present are not enough to elicit harm to our bodies.  Then one day they’ll have a huge recall because some food or toy slipped through the cracks and caused damage to children.

My biggest concern about these chemicals is that as we make new ones to industrialize the world, we are finding more sickness and disease.  More cancerAlzheimer’sdiabetes, obesity, aggressive flus, ADD, and immune deficiencies.

Heres some easy ways to protect yourself.

  • Choose organic products.
  • Eat fewer fatty and processed foods.
  • Use soap and water instead of more chemically intensive household cleaners.
  • Forgo optional treatments on carpet, furniture, and car upholstery.

I understand we can not  eliminate our exposer to all the harmful chemicals out there but if we are aware  (body awareness) then we can make change.

All of us can, if you will.

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